Will to Change

Everyone knows that to overcome periods of crisis and to succeed again there has to be a will to change, but not everyone can understand the direction of change: Claudio Ferri did.

Who listens? In the chaos of communication, which signals should we believe?

We went to Pesaro to find Claudio Ferri one of the few with sensitivity to pick up these signals. His family was among the founders of the famous brand Febal, which for years has been a world style brand for Italian kitchens and home furniture.

Claudio belongs to the second generation and was in charge of international marketing. He understood the effects of the global socio-economic crisis (GFC) and tried to change the strategy. But too many others had entrenched practices from the previous periods of growth and there was no will to change, so the family sold the business. Claudio began his search for a new approach to furniture.

Having realized that during a crisis people return to fundamental values, they return to their core and evaluate things with different parameters, 10 years ago Claudio’s will to change resulted in looking for particularly different furnishing products, in the border between craftsmanship, art and design.

His store “Primo Piano” is an apartment, appropriately on the first floor, in which people who want to furnish their homes are welcomed in a very warm and informal atmosphere, with enough time to observe each piece and the environ. His native ability to match the apparently incongruous excites the viewer.

After 10 years, now his customers are more demanding and begin to ask a lot of information about each piece, they want to be told the stories of those who have made the furniture and how it was conceived. They now have a will to change.

And it is at this point that the story of Claudio is intertwined with that of Energitismo. Energitismo commenced a few years later and perceived the need to focus on these values and started to tell the stories of the people who create with ‘love’: the people we call the “Treasures of Humanity”.

The challenge is intriguing because the big brands are losing the charm of exclusivity and that charm exists in artisanal businesses run by people with interesting stories. The small providers have a great opportunity and this positive atmosphere we breathe every day in Energitismo where, in a short time, many of our stories have come to arouse interest from international media.

Meanwhile, Claudio Ferri, in Pesaro, has become a reference point for those who want to surround themselves with something special and unique.

(This article is published under licence from Energitismo Limited)